I Saw A Dozen Faces…

Publish Date: 11.5.21

Available direct from Cool Dog Sound…
or check with your favorite independent bookstore.

I Saw a Dozen Faces… and I rocked them all:
The Diary of a Never Was by Tim Lee
Paperback 6″x9″, 300pp, 50+ photographs, and index
PLUS a cool bookmark that includes a download code for the 22-song companion music compilation Music for Dozens (song list here).

I Saw a Dozen Faces… and I rocked them all:
The Diary of a Never Was by Tim Lee
Paperback 6″x9″, 300pp, 50+ photographs, and index
Plus a cool bookmark

FOR US ORDERS ONLY.
FOR CANADIAN AND INTERNATIONAL ORDERS, PLEASE SEE BELOW!

Book
+ Bookmark
+ Music
$20 + s/h
US Only

Book
+ Bookmark
$15 + s/h
US Only

Also available via:
Amazon | Powells.com | ThriftBooks.com | Kobo.com | Goodreads.com


CANADIAN ORDERS

Book
+ Bookmark
+ Music
$20 + s/h
CANADA

Book
+ Bookmark
$15 + s/h
CANADA


INTERNATIONAL ORDERS

Book
+ Bookmark
+ Music
$20 + s/h
INTERNATIONAL

Book
+ Bookmark
$15 + s/h
INTERNATIONAL

The book is available on international Amazon sites:
Canada | France | United Kingdom | Spain | Italy | Germany

ALSO: Book Depository (UK) | !ndigo (Canada)
Bokus (Sweden) | FNAC (France) | Bookline (Hungary)

Akademibokhandeln (Sweden) | Raketen (Japan)


I Saw a Dozen Faces … is a love story, an autobiography, an eclectic history of American independent music, an overview of the New South, and a sharp study of life on the American road with a rock band back before cellphones and GPS. It’s also a psychological inquiry into why one would do these things.
… and I Rocked Them All  It’s a rock ’n’ roll book, and it’s the real thing. Tim Lee always follows the music, and his lost highway wound out of Mississippi and went all over. One of the enlightened features of his music road is that ‘fame and fortune’ are not the only rock ’n’ roll story.”
— RB Morris, singer-songwriter, poet, playwright,
author of Who Is This Man?, The Mockingbird Poems,
The Man Who Lives Here is Looney, and others


“Remember when you first discovered Mott the Hoople, Iggy Pop, or Television? Tim Lee does… and I remember when I first discovered Tim Lee. From the Windbreakers’ Terminal to Bark’s Terminal Everything, the Mississippi native has been making some of the best shelves of my record collection for  — gulp — more than 35 years, and now he’s coming for the book shelves. I Saw a Dozen Faces… is Tim’s story, but also a story of the South, and of rock ’n’ roll longevity, and passion and community and love (and all that stuff). If you’ve ever been one of those dozen faces looking back at Tim Lee in a dingy rock club, you surely need this book. If you weren’t, read it anyway, and maybe next time it will be 13.”
— Jason Cohen, music journalist


“Often funny, sometimes heartbreaking, absolutely inspirational; this is required reading for any kid with a guitar and a dream.”
— Ed Whitelock, co-author of Apocalypse Jukebox: The End of the World in American Popular Music


“I’m thrilled to hold Tim’s memories in my hand. It’s a wry, humble, hilarious, big-hearted story of a life-long rock n’ roll dream. Tim was an idol to us youngster Mississippi rockers back in the ‘80s and after, and now an inspiration to many of us not-so-young-anymore musicians to keep our rock n’ roll dreams alive.”
— Laurie Stirratt,
Blue Mountain and Teardrop City


“Reading I Saw a Dozen Faces… is like visiting with a new “old” friend on barstool at a roadside stop in an unknown town, where he shares an engaging oral history of the local music scene and why people start bands, and you quickly realize it’s a universally shared history of national import. Glad to be one of the dozens of faces layin’ witness. Tim Lee IS.”
— Mary Sack, Mary Sack Management


“In 2001, rock journalist Michael Azerrad published his scene-defining indie-rock celebration of the 1981-’91 Amerindie underground titled Our Band Could Be Your Life. Well, Southern musician Tim Lee lived that life, continues to do so, and he chronicles it here firsthand with far more passion, insight, and color than pretty much any rock memoir I’ve ever read. I should know: I was there, part of the same tribe. His band WAS – still IS – my life, along with many, many fellow fans.”
— Fred Mills, music journalist and
former editor Blurt, Harp, Magnet, and The Bob